Women in Wind Q&A: Li-Mien Lin (Taiwan)

 

The Women in Wind Global Leadership Program sat down with Li-Mien Lin, one of this year’s Participants, to chat about her pathway to renewable energy and issues facing women in the wind sector. 

Li-Mien Lin is a strategic purchaser at MHI Vestas. Before joining MHI Vestas, Li-Mien has six years working experience in NPI sourcing, general procurement, supply chain management, business development and customer service with a combined Chinese, Taiwanese and German background of working experiences and cross-cultural environments. 

How did you first become interested in renewable energy and joining the clean energy transition? 

I first became interested in renewable energy when I saw a documentary report on TV about the air pollution data in Taiwan and the increasing prevalence of lung cancer. Taiwan is generally the worst of all of the Four Asian Tigers, in particularly drawing attention to the annual mean PM 10 level of Taiwan (54 micrograms per cubic meter). A major contribution of PM 10 pollution comes from fossil fuels industry. 

When the Taiwanese Government decided to enlarge the renewable energy ratio against other energy sources and to invest in wind industry, I was very excited about it. I think it’s a positive opportunity for Taiwan, not only to improve the health of our people but also to bring economic benefits.

Tell us about your expertise and passion in the sector. How has this business area changed over the course of your career so far? For you, what is the next “space to watch” in renewable energy?

The wind industry is a relatively new sector in Taiwan and we do not have all the know-how and trained people. By joining this industry during its development stage, I can not only gain lots of knowledge of the industry but also have a great career opportunity to build up for the future. 

For me, the next space to watch in Taiwan keeping an eye on policy updates and whether the government will adopt a long-term plan to build up our  capacity and supply chain. 

The wind industry is a relatively new sector in Taiwan and we do not have all the know-how and trained people. By joining this industry during its development stage, I can not only gain lots of knowledge of the industry but also have a great career opportunity to build up for the future.

What sort of challenges did you encounter in entering the sector? 

The first challenge I see in my procurement department is that most category managers are male, unlike my previous working experience. I think the reason behind this is that most of them have industrial or technical backgrounds. However, I am glad that my mentor in our department is a senior woman and she helped me to integrate into the working environment and I could learn very fast to get my work started.

If you had to pick one key issue facing women in the wind power sector, what would it be and why? 

I think the challenge of gender diversity in this industry is that since the Asia-Pacific market is still at the preliminary phase, we do not have sufficient women who hold the degree in this area of engineering training. Thus, during the hiring process, most applicants are men.

Finally, what do you hope to achieve as a Participant in the Women in Wind Global Leadership Program? How will you contribute to the next generation of female leaders in the sector?

I hope I can learn from other female leaders in the wind sector, and gain some insight how to facilitate the gender diversity in my work place. I believe that their experiences can provide me with ideas that will enable me to contribute to improve gender diversity in my organization, both in terms of decision-making and improving the practices of my team and wider department. 

On the Blog

Sign-up for our newsletter!

Stay up-to-date on all news about the Women in Wind Global Leadership Program and more.
Scroll to Top